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Construction Design and Management Regulations (CDM)

Date: Wednesday 9th March 2016

EMA held their October 2015 event at the Ivy Market Grill with the topic on the agenda being Health & Safety, specifically Construction Design and Management Regulations 2015 (CDM).

Expert speakers included Damian Oracki of Showslice Ltd, and John Gibson of GMG Network Ltd.

Health & Safety update

The discussion started with comparison of changes on CDM regulations from 2007 to 2015, these regulations came into effect April 2015 with a transitional period that ran to October 2015.

CDM aims to improve health and safety in the industry through communication, cooperation and coordination.

Key Fundamentals

Any construction even temporary infrastructure (i.e. marquees and seating/staging structures) activity that requires more than 1 contractor needs to have an appointed Principal Designer (PD) and Principal Contractor (PC). 

CDM 2015 requires a Principal Designer (PD) to replace the CDM-Co-ordinator. This PD is part of the design team.

Notifiable form (F10) projects when build phase is longer than 30 working days with more than 20 persons working on the event simultaneously or exceeds 500 person days.

Current responsibilities

Workers are responsible for taking care of their own health & safety and others affected by their actions, report unsafe practices and cooperate with all involved parties.

Client is responsible for appointing PD and PC, ensure duties are carried out, suitable documentation drawn up in planning phase and making sure that all relevant information is provided to all duty holders.

Principal Contractor is responsible for helping with design of event & risk associated with design, CPP, liaising with the (PD) on design matters and passing relevant information to all duty holders during planning.

Principal designer is responsible for design of event and risk associated with design, managing health & safety of the project and documentation and liaising with the (PC) on design matters to help manage event.

What has really changed?

• CDM 2007 has been replaced by CDM 2015. These regulations came into effect April 2015 with a transitional period that ran to October 2015.

• Builds for temporary infrastructure such as marquees and seating/staging structures are now considered construction work.
Any construction activity that requires more than 1 contractor needs to have an appointed Principal Designer (PD) and Principal Contractor (PC).

• CDM 2015 requires a Principal Designer (PD) to replace the CDM-Co-ordinator. This PD is part of the design team. More info on role to follow.

• Notifiable (F10) projects when build phase is longer than 30 working days with more than 20 persons working on the event simultaneously or exceeds 500 person days.

The Health & Safety at Work etc. Act 1974

Health and safety law states that organisations must:

• Assess risks to employees, suppliers, visitors, volunteers, partners and any other people who could be affected by their activities.

• Arrange for the effective planning, organisation, control, monitoring and review of preventive and protective measures.

• Have a written health and safety policy if they have five or more employees - MHSWA (1999).

• Ensure they have access to competent health and safety advice.

• Consult employees about their risks at work and current preventive and protective measures. 

Failure to comply with these requirements can have serious consequences – for both organisations and individuals. Sanctions include fines, imprisonment and disqualification. 

Things to consider

Ensuring you have all the required information ready for your suppliers. This could include, however not limited to, your project brief, contractor or supplier rules, venue or site rules and conditions, budget restraints and other project or company information.

Some questions that you should consider when vetting suppliers:

Number of years in operations.
• Company Health & Safety Policy and company Health & Safety Objectives.
• Insurance Documentation.
• Risk Assessments and Safe Systems of Work for the work you require them to carry out.
• Their communication procedures to their staff and sub-contractors.
• Details of company H&S training and Accident investigation records.
• Any safety awards or any safety executive notices or prosecutions.
• Details of how the company assess their sub-contractors and environmental Policy.

Further links: 

G – guide: If you manage international events the G- guide is an excellent starting point and is designed to be easy to understand at all levels of the supply chain http://theg-guide.org/index.html

Guidance for the Management & Use of Stages: this document is primarily written for festivals and large scale staging but the first six sections include useful information on the concepts and requirements of CDM which are applicable across all events   http://www.stages.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Event-Structures-Guidance-2015.pdf

Thanks go to the panel of speakers and venue!